Nayfield Preserve – Welcoming spring!

Nayfield Preserve is located on Lambertville Hopewell Rd in Hopewell.

Link to trail map.IMG_3257I was recently contacted by a researcher interested in studying Viburnum species and their pollinators and I jumped at the chance to show him around Nayfield. This preserve can be tricky to find, but once you arrive, it is such a wonderful place to walk. The big open field, the drier upland area, the wet lowland area, vernal pools and evergreen forest…I mean, what is there not to love? When I hike with others, I always learn something new.  Today was no exception!

For a while now, I have  puzzled over a certain shrub which, in some ways, resembles a Cherry tree (Prunus). Cherry trees have alternate branching patterns but this shrub had branches that were opposite each other. Although I know that there are only a handful of trees which have branches directly opposite each other, nothing in my mental plant catalog could help me identify what I was seeing.

Today, I learned that what I was seeing was none other than a very large Blackhaw Viburnums (Viburnum prunifolium )! I know this shrub well, but I mistakenly thought they didn’t grow larger than 10 feet tall. Today, I learned that Blackhaw can grow to almost 40 feet tall! How boring would life be if we already knew it all?IMG_3247Multiflora Rose, Rosa multiflora, leafing out. This invasive bramble is the first woody plant that I have seen with leaves this year.IMG_3253Blackhaw Viburnum flower buds about to open! Doesn’t it look like a little broccoli head hiding within the bud scales? IMG_3263Garlic Mustard, Alliaria petiolata, another invasive plant which always seems to be springing ahead of the pack! Garlic mustard is considered an edible. I have heard that people sometimes use it as a substitute for garlic when making pesto. I have a bunch of it in my yard, so I think I might need to try this recipe later this spring!IMG_3269Fox scat with what looks like a little femur, tibia and fibula in it. Perhaps remnants of rodent dinner.IMG_3278This tree caught my eye as I entered the field. The silvery buds were glowing in the morning sun!  My guess is that it is some sort of Pussy Willow, Salix spp.IMG_3274The buds were so soft under my fingers that it felt as if I was petting a rabbit! If anyone has a guess as to what species this is, please let me know!IMG_3283Another “New-To-Me” species! This is called Seedbox, Ludwigia alternifolia! How fabulous are these seed capsules? When Seedbox is in bloom it has beautiful yellow flowers and that would be a gorgeous native plant to add to any garden!IMG_3307I think everyone needs another view of these seed capsules! I can’t help but smile when I see them 🙂

5 thoughts on “Nayfield Preserve – Welcoming spring!

  1. Elaine Chromeck

    What a fantastic time to be out walking — I love those seed pods too — going to have to look more closely at things when I’m outside.

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  2. Khürt Williams

    Ignoring the risk from maple and cedar pollen, I went out for a hike in the Sourland Mountain Preserve with my wife. I was looking for spring flowers—rue anemone etc.—but I was disappointed. It’s probably too early.

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